Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) testing is used to determine the integrity and quality of structural concrete or stone (up to 6 feet thick) by measuring the speed and attenuation of an ultrasonic wave passing through the element being tested. Areas with lower velocities typically have lower density and strength relative to high velocity areas. Data collected along multiple test paths can be used to create tomographic images of defects.

  • Identify voiding, honeycombing, cracking and other defects
  • Identify areas of low-quality concrete
  • Define the size and shape of a defect by using multiple test paths
  • Two-sided access required for direct-path testing
  • Test around corners when complex geometry precludes direct-path testing, such as at beam intersections
  • Test across a surface for surface-opening crack depth measurements

Sonic Pulse Velocity (SPV) testing is used at lower frequencies for distances greater than 6 feet, such as large columns, beams, and dams.

  • Test concrete, stone, or wood members up to 25 feet thick
Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity UPV, Olson Engineering

Applicable On:

Elevated Slabs

Columns

Beams

Dams

Members with Two-Sided Access 

Test For:

Voids

Honeycomb

Cracks

Delaminations

Strength of Early Age Concrete

Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity UPV, Olson Engineering
Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity UPV, Olson Engineering
Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity UPV, Olson Engineering
Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity UPV, Olson Engineering
Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity UPV, Olson Engineering

The UPV System

Quality Assurance

Determine the integrity of structural concrete

Diagnose Defects

Identify and map voids, honeycomb, cracks, delaminations, and other damage

Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity UPV, Olson Engineering
Testing Options

The two surfaces used for testing can either be a direct transmission, semi-direct transmission, or an indirect transmission

Test New Pours

The UPV system can predict the strength of early age concrete

Variety of Materials

Test on concrete, wood, masonry, stone, ceramics, and metal materials